Items related to music video



ASCII lyric music videos

Friday. 01 March 2013. 00:00 UTC
ASCII lyric vids are music videos made primarily of a song’s lyrics rendered as computer text and animated over time to pair with the vocals. [What is ASCII?] These pure lyric vids are distinct from representational ASCII art vids which use glyph shapes as abstract textural components, rather than as text meant to be read. These genres are not mutually exclusive, however. [What is ASCII art?] To celebrate being blown away by the new

Petula Clark video, here are a few notches in the genre listed in reverse-chronological order. If you know of more do mention it.


Petula Clark—Cut Copy Me (2013)


Portal 2—Want You Gone (2011). The not-so-surprising sequel.


The Chameleons – Up The Down Escalator (2010). A fan video by Mr. Nicky Ramone using my Jed source code as a base.


Portal—Still Alive (2007). Written by Jonathan Coulton for the ground-breaking game Portal.


Grandaddy—Jed’s Other Poem (2005). A fan vid made-good. By yours, truly.



Jed's Other Poem on the Commodore 64

Thursday. 03 May 2012. 17:00 UTC
Stefan Post of PostWare recently took it upon himself to port the source code for our Jed’s Other Poem music video from its original Applesoft BASIC form to Commodore BASIC. This means Jed can now run on the Commodore 64! You can read Post’s notes and download his C64 port here: http://www.postware.nl/site/Jed2.html


Mac OS X users can download Vice 2.3 which is a package of several related emulators. When downloaded, open the x64sc emulator and from the File menu select Smart attach Disk/Tape (or hit Command+O). Select Posts’s PRG file and before long you will see Jed’s blinking cursor. Adjust the emulator’s speed as necessary.

Of course you can still download the original Applesoft BASIC code and run it on an Apple 2 emulator. For OS X we recommend Virtual ][ which emulates the Apple ][, ][+, and //e. And if you happen to have an actual vintage Apple laying around you can use the audio file included in the source code package to load Jed onto it via the cassette port—just like the guys at Panic Software! See their blog post about it: An Apple //e, an iPad, and Jed.



The Pendulum Swings Again

Wednesday. 22 September 2010. 00:00 UTC

Today we are very happy to release the video for Tomas Halberstad’s new single The Pendulum Swings Again. Have a listen as you journey to the far reaches of the universe to meet some new (non-human) friends. Inspired by The Last Starfighter, WarGames, the original Tron, various others.



Panic combines an, iPad, an Apple //e, and our Jed video

Wednesday. 12 May 2010. 15:00 UTC
A few weeks ago Stewart happened upon pictures of Panic Inc‘s new offices. In the shuffle was a photo of their vintage Apple //e computer sitting at an empty desk. Lovers of vintage hardware can’t resist. Stewart emailed Panic to ask if they would “do him the honor” of running the Jed’s Other Poem music video source code on it. Despite their tight schedules—including the recent release and promotion of Transmit 4—they did indeed get the code onto their Apple //e and even filmed their own version of the video! Have a look at what we’re affectionately dubbing “Jed Panic.”

Jed’s Other Poem is a music video for the Grandaddy song of the same name. And (perhaps) the world’s first open-source music video. You can download the Jed source code package to run on your Virtual II emulator or even your own vintage Apple II series machine. To do the latter just play the audio from the “cassette tape” source code file into your vintage Apple’s cassette drive port. You’ll need an audio cable with male mini-jacks on either end. (Read up on Apple DOS and the “LOAD” command, you’ll be fine.)

After Panic posted their version of the Jed video other Apple-related sites—such as Daring Fireball, TUAW, and 9to5 Mac—linked to it. The flood of traffic brought down Panic’s site temporarily. (We think that’s pretty hardcore.)